mayo

Your New Favorite (Corn) Salad

by Anne Maxfield on August 19, 2019

Even thought I was in the throes of moving, when I saw this corn salad recipe on the Smitten Kitchen site, I paused and made it for lunch for friends who were helping us. Just give yourself a little time for the onions to pickle.

Your New Favorite (Corn) Salad

  • 1/2 a small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • Slightly heaped 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 6 medium ears corn, shucked
  • 1/3 cup sour cream, or crema
  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise
  • 3 ounces (heaped 1/2 cup) crumbled cotija cheese
  • 1 lime, halved
  • Tajín seasoning or chile powder
  • Handful of fresh cilantro leaves

Combine red onion, red wine vinegar, 2 tablespoons cold water, salt, and sugar in a bowl or jar. Set in fridge until needed. Onions will be very lightly pickled by the time you’re done assembling the salad, but if you can give them 1-2 hours in the fridge, they’ll be better.

Heat a grill or grill pan to medium-high. Lightly oil grill grates and place corn cobs directly on them. Cook corn until charred in spots all over, turning as often as needed. Transfer them to a cutting board to cool slightly.

While you’re grilling your corn, combine sour cream, mayo, and cotija cheese. Spread on the bottom of your serving plate. Cut corn from cobs with a sharp knife and pile it over the cheese mix on the platter. Squeeze the juice of half a lime all over, then scatter with the pickled onion rings from the fridge. Generously shake Tajín or chile powder all over; if you’re using plain chile powder, season with salt and an extra squeeze of lime. Top with cilantro leaves. Cut remaining lime half into wedges and serve alongside. Serve and enjoy right away while the dressing is cold, and the corn is warm!

My verdict: Amazing! I’ve been wanting to try to make elote anyway and seeing this just sealed the deal. I had some chorizo, so we grilled that and served it with the corn salad. It was a perfect summer lunch and there wasn’t a kernel of corn leftover.

It was so good, that in the middle of moving, I almost bought some more corn just to grill so we could have it in our new (grillless apartment), but I’m hoping my grill pan will do a decent job.

If you have a Mexican grocery nearby, you can get the Tajin, cojita and crema there, otherwise substitute chile powder, crumbled feta and sour cream. I did use homemade mayo and crema, but it’s so good that that probably didn’t make much of a difference.

The Tajin seasoning is great and you’ll find lots of other uses for it. I might introduce it to some Fritos and see if I can replicate my favorite junk food from Mexico—Fritos with chili and lime. What do you put it on?

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Celery Root Remoulade Recipe

by Anne Maxfield on October 3, 2013

Accidental Locavore Celery Root RemouladeOne of the Accidental Locavore’s favorite salads, not easily found outside of France, is celery root remoulade. It may be that it’s a little difficult to find celery root and it’s definitely not going to rank high in the lists of attractive vegetables (which may be why it’s not easy to find – we like attractive, perfect produce), so when my CSA had celery root last week I snatched it up! Here’s how I made my remoulade.  (Make the dressing first as the celery root will tend to discolor.)

  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • ¼ cup Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon capers (optional)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 knobs of celery root, peeled and grated (see below for peeling and grating ideas)

In a medium bowl, mix together the mayo, mustard, lemon juice and capers. Add the celery root, mix until well coated with the dressing, taste and add salt and pepper as needed. Serve and enjoy!

Accidental Locavore Celery Root RemouladeMy verdict: So good, took me right back to Paris! I used the grater disk on my food processor to grate the celery root, but you could use a grater or mandoline. To peel the root, cut off the top and bottom and peel the sides with a very sharp peeler (something I don’t own) or a paring knife. I remember the celeriac remoulade in France having capers, so I tossed some in, that’s up to you. And as always, homemade mayo is easy and makes the dish. If anyone has a recommendation for a really good vegetable peeler, please let me know. I have a drawerful of crappy ones.

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Lobster vs. Crab: Which is the Ultimate Roll?

by Anne Maxfield on August 26, 2013

Accidental Locavore Fried ClamsThere are mysteries about Manhattan that puzzle the Accidental Locavore and several of them have to do with seafood. Why, for example, in a city where there is cuisine from almost every country in the world, is it almost impossible to find an acceptable fried clam? Was it in the spirit of PT Barnum (“a sucker born every minute”) that someone decided that clam strips – the most inedible part of the clam – would be an acceptable fried food? As any New Englander (or anyone with taste buds) would tell you, the belly is the best part of a clam. Which is why the fried clams you get anywhere north of New York are far superior to anything found in the Big Apple.

Accidental Locavore Lobster Roll and FriesThe other mystery concerns one of the trendy foods of the moment – lobster rolls. A lobster roll is a fine thing to do with a lobster, if you, like my husband, are not inclined to mess with a whole lobster (however, there’s something really satisfying about working through a lobster and plopping it in melted butter). Lobster rolls certainly beat other permutations like lobster mac and cheese or lobster chop suey (can lobster macaroons be far behind?). However, it’s something that shouldn’t be messed with and adding caviar or vanilla is just plain wrong – ditto serving it in anything other than a buttered and toasted spilt-top hot dog roll.

Accidental Locavore Crabmeat RollWhat about its cousin, the crabmeat roll? Something never seen on a New York menu (when I did a Google search for it, only sushi came up). Possibly, it’s a labor thing – it’s a lot easier to break up a lobster (claws, tail, possibly a little body meat) and it comes in a bigger package. Crabs, especially the Maine varieties, are a lot smaller and harder to “pick.” But what you’re left with – the fine strands of crabmeat, tossed with just enough mayonnaise to hold it together, on a hamburger roll, lightly toasted on a grill until it just loses its chill – is about as good as a sandwich can get. Add some hot fries, a cold iced tea, a view of the ocean and you have my idea of the perfect summer lunch.

 

 

 

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Recipes: French Potato Salad, Party Colored Coleslaw

by Anne Maxfield on September 3, 2010

Accidental Locavore Party Colored ColeslawLast week, theAccidental Locavore was using up the last of the latest farmbasket and anticipating company so I whipped up a batch of potato salad and coleslaw. I’m not a big fan of mayo and egg based potato salad so my fat delivery system comes via bacon. Here’s my version of a French potato salad:

  • Wash and cut into small chunks about a dozen small potatoes. I used small corollas, but new potatoes work fine too.
  • Cook in salted water to cover, until fork tender.
  • While the potatoes are cooking, slowly cook about 4-5 slices of thick bacon, sliced into 1/2″ matchsticks until browned and the fat is rendered.
  • Drain the potatoes and put in a large bowl.
  • Add 1 red onion chopped and about a tablespoon of fresh thyme (leaves stripped from the stems). You can also use fresh tarragon.
  • Remove the bacon from the pan and add to the potatoes.
  • Pour the bacon fat into a small heatproof bowl. Add red wine vinegar, salt and pepper and about 1-2 tablespoons of Dijon mustard. Mix well and pour over the potatoes. Toss until the dressing is absorbed.
  • You may need to add a little olive oildepending on how much fat the bacon has rendered. I like my salad dressing to be a little more acid than oily so I usually do about a 50-50 oil to acid ratio, but it’s up to you to adjust to taste.

For the party colored coleslaw, shred in a food processor with the shredding disk:

  • 1 small head purple cabbage
  • 1 each red,orange, and yellow peppers
  • 1-2 carrots (peeled)

Put in a mixing bowl. Add 1 onion finely chopped (I used a red one, keeping with the party colors)

Mix in:

  • About a cup of mayonnaise (I used my own)
  • 1/2 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup juice from a container of dill pickles (if you have it)
  • Salt and pepper

Adjust to taste, serve and enjoy.

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