salad recipe

Three-Cabbage Cole Slaw Recipe

by Anne Maxfield on July 4, 2013

Accidental Locavore 3 Cabbage ColeslawAre you fond of “typical” coleslaw and potato salad, or like the Accidental Locavore, do you find it a little sweet and not terribly interesting? We had a lovely head of cabbage from a recent CSA selection and since it was too hot outside to think about cooking it, I was trying to figure out a good way to use it. Here’s a loose recipe for what made a ton of coleslaw.

  • ½ head of Chinese cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium red onion, cut into wedges
  • ½ bunch cilantro, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup fresh mint
  • 1 small head of cabbage, cored and cut into wedges
  • 1 bunch of bok choy, cut into 4” pieces
  • 5 radishes
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • ¼ cup rice wine vinegar
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 2 tablespoons Sriracha
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce

In a large mixing bowl add the Chinese cabbage. In a food processor with the regular blade, add the onion and process until it is finely chopped; add to the mixing bowl. Chop the mint and cilantro in the food processor until finely chopped. Add to the mixing bowl. Remove the regular blade and replace with the shredding disc. Shred the cabbage, the bok choy, and radishes and add them to the mixing bowl, then add the mayonnaise, rice wine vinegar, lime juice, Sriracha and soy sauce. Toss to mix well, taste and adjust accordingly. Serve and enjoy.

My verdict: Pretty good. Certainly not sweet, or heavy, but that could be because I made my own mayo. A couple of other people thought it was the best coleslaw they’d ever eaten (good to have friends, right?)! I used the food processor for almost everything, but you might want to practice your knife skills and chop by hand. The cabbages, especially the bok choy give off a lot of water, so you might want to let them sit for a few minutes and then drain off the excess liquid before dressing the coleslaw. If you wanted this a little sweeter, a tablespoon or two of brown sugar might be an interesting addition. What else would you add? Chopped peanuts?

 

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Salad Frisée Lardons

by Anne Maxfield on November 29, 2012

Accidental Locavore FriseeThis is a classic bistro salad that is a particular favorite of the Accidental Locavore’s husband and her father. A poached egg is the traditional accompaniment. I usually eat mine without as I have an old abhorrence of runny egg yolks, but I’m told it adds that certain je ne sais quoi (f you need help poaching the eggs, click here).  It’s quick to make and is a good winter salad.

Salad Frisée Lardons

Serves 4
Prep time 20 minutes
Meal type Salad
Region French
The Accidental Locavore salad frisee lardon recipe. A classic bistro salad recipe with frisee, bacon and a poached egg with a vinaigrette dressing.

Ingredients

  • 1 head frisée, washed, dried and torn into bite-sized pieces
  • 4 thick slices bacon, cut into 1/2 inch matchsticks (lardons)
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 small shallot, finely minced
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon herbs de Provence
  • 1/2 cup blue cheese, crumbled (use a good Roquefort)
  • 1 egg per person (optional)

Directions

Step 1
If you are poaching the eggs, start them first. Heat a small sauté pan with a tablespoon of oil over medium heat. Add the bacon and cook until the fat is rendered and the bacon is cooked but not crispy. Remove the bacon and drain on a paper towel. Reserve all the fat for the dressing. In a small bowl or 1-cup measuring cup, add the shallot, mustard, salt and pepper, herbs de Provence and red wine vinegar. Slowly whisk in the bacon fat until the dressing starts to emulsify. Taste and adjust olive oil and seasonings as desired.
Step 2
To construct the salad: Place the frisée and bacon in a large bowl. Add the dressing and toss to combine. On individual plates, put a mound of the dressed frisée. Top with the crumbled blue cheese and a poached egg if using. Serve and enjoy!

Accidental Locavore Frisee LardonsMy verdict: This is a great salad that I don’t make enough! If you see frisée in the market, give this a try. Mushrooms or walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped are also a nice touch. The frisée on its own is also a good side salad for rich foods like duck (confit) or fois gras.

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Grilled Corn Salad

by Anne Maxfield on September 13, 2012

Accidental Locavore Corn SaladAs much as everyone loves corn on the cob, there does come a time, later in the summer, when a little variety is welcome. This is a great side dish salad, adapted from Food & Wine. I served it with some grilled pork chops, but it would work with just about anything. Serves 4.

Grilled Corn Salad

  • 4 large ears of corn, shucked (about 2 ½ cups)
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded and thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons mint leaves, coarsely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons parsley, coarsely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons cilantro, coarsely chopped

Heat a grill or grill pan. Brush the corn with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill over moderately high heat, turning until cooked and charred in spots, about 12 minutes. Let cool.
Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the onion and lime juice and let stand 10 minutes. Add the syrup, jalapeno, 2 tablespoons olive oil, salt and pepper and mix well.
Working in a large bowl or on a cutting board, cut the kernels off the cobs (you want chunks here). Add the onion dressing, mint, parsley and cilantro, and toss. Serve and enjoy!

My verdict: This was a great, fresh side dish! I made it on a grill pan and it came out fine. It would probably be even better on a charcoal grill. I used the maple syrup, but am not sure how necessary it is.

Wondering how some cheese (feta or a Mexican queso fresco) would be.

I find cutting the kernels off of corn more difficult in a bowl, but if you don’t want to be cleaning corn up, it’s neater that way. The Barefoot Contessa just shared her way of cutting corn. She cuts off the bottom so it will stand tall and puts a clean dishtowel on the counter so you can just gather up any strays. Save the cobs and freeze them for corn chowder later on in the fall.

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Moroccan Inspired Eggplant Salad Recipe

by Anne Maxfield on July 26, 2012

The Accidental Locavore’s friend Jamilla was describing how she makes eggplant while we had lunch recently, across the street from the Union Square Greenmarket. If I wasn’t already on the verge of looking like a bag lady, I would have dashed back and grabbed some eggplants. But being the mature individual I am (stop snickering), I waited and got a beauty from Stokes Farm a couple of days later. If you’re worried about heating up an oven, do it early in the morning, or grill the eggplant.  This will serve about 4 as a salad or dip.

Moroccan Inspired Eggplant Salad

Serves 4
Prep time 10 minutes
Cook time 30 minutes
Total time 40 minutes
Dietary Vegan, Vegetarian
Meal type Salad, Side Dish
The Accidental Locavore shares a recipe for an easy roasted eggplant salad with harissa, cilantro and garlic. Smooth and smokey, this recipe for eggplant can be used as an appetizer, salad or side dish.

Ingredients

  • 2 medium eggplant, peeled and sliced lengthwise into 3/4“ slices
  • 1 head garlic, unpeeled
  • 1/2 cup olive oil (for brushing the eggplant and garlic)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground corriander
  • salt, to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon harissa (more to taste)
  • 1/4 cup cilantro, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup flat-leafed parsley, finely chopped
  • juice of 1/2 lemon

Directions

Step 1
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Cut the top 1/3 of the garlic off. Place the sliced eggplant and the garlic on a baking sheet (don’t crowd, you might need two pans). Sprinkle the garlic and both sides of the eggplant with olive oil, half the cumin and coriander, and salt. Roast for 10 minutes or until it starts to turn golden brown. Flip and cook the other side for 10 more minutes until the eggplant is golden and tender.
Step 2
When the eggplant is cool enough to handle, coarsely chop it and put it in a medium sized mixing bowl. Squeeze the roasted garlic into the bowl. Add the remaining cumin and coriander, paprika, harissa. Mix until everything is well combined. Taste, add salt and more harissa if necessary. Add the cilantro, parsley and lemon juice, taste and adjust seasonings. Serve chilled or at room temperature and enjoy!

My verdict: this was really good even though I messed up and forgot to season the eggplant with the cumin and coriander before roasting it. I added it afterwards while it was still warm and it tasted fine. Jamilla was concerned that it wasn’t going to be the same. Then I cheated and added some garlic confit to it before mixing it up (no such thing as too much garlic, right?). If you can be patient, this was even better the next day, sweet and jam-like.

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