roast

Roasting: 10 Easy Steps to a Perfect Roast

by Anne Maxfield on December 22, 2016

Accidental Locavore Roasting Thai ChickenThe Accidental Locavore thinks that roasting meat (or vegetables) is one of the easiest ways to get an impressive dinner on the table.

Don’t be afraid of roasting. If you have the right tools, it’s a snap.

Roasting in 10 easy steps:

  1. Remove the meat from the fridge about an hour before you want to start.
  2. Make sure oven racks are in the middle of the oven and you have enough room for the roasting pan and its contents. If not, lower the rack until you do.
  3. Preheat the oven: 350° for most meats, 250° if you’re doing a slow roast duck, hotter for chickens and vegetables.
  4. Speaking of vegetables, tossing them in olive oil, salt and pepper and throwing them on a sheet pan in a 400° oven always works.
  5. And don’t forget potatoes! Cut in chunks, boiled until just tender and tossed into the bottom of a pan about 15 minutes before the meat is cooked, makes wonderful roast potatoes (especially good under chickens and ducks!).Accidental Locavore Roasting Potatoes
  6. While the oven is heating, pat the meat dry with paper towels. Salt and pepper liberally (i.e. use more than you think), inside and out.
  7. If you’re using a rack a quick spray or a light rub of oil makes clean-up easier.
  8. Place your meat on the pan (or rack) and put it in the oven. The length of time your meat will need to cook depends on the size of your roast and how well cooked you like your meat. This is where the instant-read thermometer will save the day. Click here for a handy chart and remember to always stick the thermometer in the thick part of your roast (for chicken it’s the thigh).
  9. When the meat is cooked to your liking, remove it from the oven and let it rest for at least 10 minutes. This is not about torturing you or your guests, it’s about letting the juices re-circulate, making the meat tender and juicy.
  10. Carve, serve and enjoy!
    See, wasn’t that easy? What are your best roasting tips?

 

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Slow Roasted Duck Recipe

by Anne Maxfield on December 15, 2016

Accidental Locavore Slow Roasted DuckThis slow roasted duck is the Accidental Locavore’s favorite way to roast a duck.

If you’ve got an afternoon, and need an excuse to binge watch ______, this is your meal.

The fact that it couldn’t be easier, or more delicious, are just bennies.

A V-shaped roasting rack helps, but you can do it with a regular rack and roasting pan. Clean-up is much easier if you lightly oil the rack.

Slow Roasted Duck:

  • 1 whole duck
  • Salt & pepper
  • Garlic cloves, peeled (optional)
  • A lemon or orange cut into chunks (optional)
  • Fresh herbs, such as rosemary or thyme (optional) or a spice rub of your choice

Preheat your oven to 250°

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Accidental Locavore Duck for RoastingRinse and dry the duck.

Salt and pepper it, inside and out, and if you’re using them toss some peeled garlic cloves, orange or lemon chunks and herbs inside.

Prick the duck all over with a fork, and put it on the rack in the roasting pan.

Roast for an hour.

Remove it, turn it over, and prick it with the fork.

Do this total of 4 times (4 hours).

After the last time, turn the oven up to 400°, and put the duck back in for 15-30 minutes, depending on how crispy you like the skin.

Serve and enjoy!

My verdict: I can’t tell you how many times I’ve made this duck. It’s great and foolproof!

You can rub the duck with any spice mix, or just simply salt and pepper.

I happen to like barbecue sauce with duck, the plum hoisin sauce is also great with it, and often take some of my cousin Ellen’s amazing clementine marmalade, warm it with some citron vodka, and a tablespoon of maple syrup to thin it down with, making a my version of duck à l’orange.

Don’t forget to save the fat (run it through a fine strainer or coffee filter) to sautée some spinach or roast potatoes with.

Speaking of potatoes, some par-boiled chunks of potatoes tossed in the bottom of the roasting pan for the last 15-30 minutes, are always incredible!

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Accidental Locavore Pimentos and Cranberry Beans

 If you’re like the Accidental Locavore, you probably haven’t given pimentos much thought. They’re the little red things inside green olives, n’est pas? Correct, but how did they get there, and what do they look like? In this week’s farmbasket, there was a quartet of pimentos, along with a little note: “we’re pimentos, roast us“. It’s hard to spot in this photo, but behind the cranberry beans. there’s a little green stem, that’s one of the pimentos. They look a little like a persimmon, but bright red, heavy and firm.
Since sometimes, I do what I’m told, I roasted them on the grill until the skins were blackened and they were tender. Then put them in a bowl with a piece of saran wrap tightly over it, to steam off the skins (this works for roasting all peppers, so remember it) and let them sit for about 1/2 hour. Then I took the skin off, cut out the center and seeds, and cut them into strips. They’re currently in a jar with some olive oil, awaiting a salad, sandwich, or even a cocktail olive…

As you can see from the photo, I got a mess of cranberry beans. Anyone have a good recipe for them?
Also in this week’s basket, the first cantaloupe of the season which I am going to finish as soon as I post this. It’s perfect, and so good! Corn, tomatoes, including the first of the heirlooms, salad greens, romaine lettuce, little round squashes, yellow and green, tiny potatoes, possibly corrolas, a beautiful purple cabbage, zucchini and summer squash, and a bunch of basil with the biggest leaves I’ve ever seen!
Don’t forget to send me your ideas for the cranberry beans!
On Friday, my first attempt at pickling, check it out.

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