horseradish

Short Ribs Braised in Beer

by Anne Maxfield on February 16, 2017

Accidental Locavore Short Ribs and PotatoesShort ribs are a great winter food and the Accidental Locavore has worked and eaten my way through a lot of short rib recipes.

This one from Gordon Hammersley’s Bistro Cooking at Home has become my go-to recipe.

You can make them in the oven, or a slow cooker, your choice–this is for the oven. Serves 6 but you can easily cut it back to 2 or 4.

Use 1-2 short ribs per person depending on size. When I cut down the recipe, I usually just cut down on the vegetable oil, beer, and broth, everything else just adds flavor.

Short Ribs Braised in Beer

  • 6-8 pounds beef short ribs
  • Salt & pepper
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 pound bacon cut into 1″ pieces
  • 2 medium sized red onions sliced into 1/2″ rounds (cut across the onion to make rings)
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste (if you buy it in a tube it costs more, but you always have it for weird amounts like this)
  • 2 bottles stout beer (like Guiness)
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 cups beef stock (1 cup, and some water is fine)

Preheat the oven to 350°.

Generously salt and pepper the short ribs.

In a large heavy ovenproof pot or Dutch oven, heat the oil until very hot.

Sear the ribs (in batches if you’ve got a lot of them) until brown on all sides.

Remove the ribs from the pan, and pour off the excess oil, but don’t clean the pan.

Reduce the heat to medium, add the bacon, and cook until the  fat is rendered, about 5 minutes.

Add the onions and cook until lightly browned, about 6 minutes (don’t worry if the onions start to fall apart–they will).

Stir the tomato paste in and cook, stirring, for another 2 minutes.

Add the beer, vinegar, beef stock, and the ribs. Bring the liquid to a boil.

Cover the pot and cook in the oven until the short ribs are fork tender, about 2 hours and 15 minutes.

When you’re ready to serve, remove the ribs, and onions from the pot and set aside.

Bring the liquid to a boil and cook until it’s reduced by at least a third (or as thick you want the sauce). Skim fat off.

Taste and check for seasoning. Add the ribs and onions back to the sauce, serve and enjoy!

My verdict: This has become our favorite short rib recipe. I serve them with mashed potatoes, usually with horseradish added. It really brings out the flavor and helps to cut some of the richness.

Figure on 1-2 ribs per person, depending on the size (and whether you want leftovers).

If you want to use your slow cooker for these, instead of covering the pot and putting it in the oven, just dump everything into the pot of a slow cooker, cover and cook on low.

Like most braised meats, these are even better the next day (and you can get a lot more of the fat off).

 

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Pearl Onions and Brussels Sprouts in Horseradish Cream Sauce

by Anne Maxfield on November 17, 2016

 Accidental Locavore Quartered Brussels SproutsThe Accidental Locavore’s mother always insisted on pearl onions for Thanksgiving.

No one really likes pearl onions “straight-up”.

When I found this recipe from Bon Appètit it seemed like a great combination.

Also perfect for Thanksgiving because you don’t need the oven.

Pearl Onions and Brussels Sprouts in Horseradish Cream

  • 1 bag frozen pearl onions thawed
  • 1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and cut in half the long way
  • 3 tablespoons horseradish (more to taste)
  • 2 teaspoons flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice or nutmeg
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme

Cook the Brussels sprouts until just tender either in a microwave for 5 minutes, or boil them in salted water for about 6 minutes. Drain well and set aside.

Combine the horseradish, flour and allspice in a small bowl, mix well and whisk in the cream. Set aside.

Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the thyme and stir 30 seconds. Add the onions and Brussels sprouts and saute until heated through, about 4 minutes.

Add the horseradish mixture, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the cream is reduced to a glaze, coating the vegetables, about 3 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper and more horseradish if you like. Serve and enjoy!

Accidental Locavore Peeling HorseradishMy verdict: This is a tried and true Thanksgiving hit! Even the non-pearl onion and/or Brussels sprouts haters often find themselves surprised by how good this is!

Besides not needing an oven, you can precook the Brussels sprouts and onions and set them aside. Ditto for the horseradish sauce. Then, just finish them before you’re ready to serve (about 5 minutes or until they’re warm).

True confession, much to my friend Zhu Zhu’s disgust, I always buy frozen pearl onions. They’re such a pain to peel and at Thanksgiving the last thing you need is to spend an hour peeling tiny onions. If you want to go the fresh route, blanch them and peel them (you might want to cook them first for a couple of minutes before adding the sprouts to the pan).

What’s a family Thanksgiving food tradition you’d like to change?

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Escarole Recipe: Try This Easy Escarole Salad

by Anne Maxfield on July 7, 2016

Accidental Locavore Escarole Salad RecipeI hate gritty produce.

At the CSA pick-up recently, one of the things Frank brought home was a beautiful head of escarole. It’s something I always like, both cooked and raw, but tend to avoid because it needs careful washing and sometimes I’m just not in the mood (you know what I mean?).

After a leisurely bath and a thorough shower (the escarole, not the Accidental Locavore), it was ready for a simple escarole salad recipe I’d seen in bon appètit. This served 6:

  • ¼ small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons crème fraîche
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 6 cups torn escarole (from about 2 heads)
  • 2 tablespoons rinsed capers
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ cup shaved peeled horseradish (or prepared horseradish)

Soak onion in a small bowl of ice water at least 30 minutes (you can do this while the escarole is soaking). Drain and pat dry.

Whisk crème fraîche, oil, lemon juice, and vinegar in a large bowl. Add escarole, capers, and drained onion; season with salt and pepper and toss to coat.

Top salad with horseradish and season with more pepper, serve and enjoy!

Finished Escarole RecipeMy verdict: This escarole salad was made for dinner with friends. Because there wasn’t a scrap left, it proved to be a big hit. Super simple and really delicious! While the summer may be peak time for escarole, it’s not for fresh horseradish, which becomes a small problem. Imagine how much better this could be with the punch you’d get from fresh (or fresher than what I had) horseradish!

Instead of soaking the onions (which I do a lot these days with raw onions) I had made some pickled red onions and used those instead.

The dressing I made separately so I could do it ahead of time. Check it for taste, remembering that it’s going on bitter greens so you might want to add a bit more crème fraîche and adjust the horseradish accordingly.

It’s a great dressing and would work well on a lot of different greens. Grilled radicchio anyone?

 

 

 

 

 

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3 Ingredient DIY Horseradish

by Anne Maxfield on December 10, 2015

Accidental Locavore Peeling HorseradishI’m not sure how holiday-related this is (until you have roast beef leftovers), but if you’re lucky enough to find fresh horseradish at the market, or even luckier, like the Accidental Locavore, to have a friend who grew some, it’s really simple to make your own (just like the stuff in a jar). Mine came with a warning to make it outside, which may or may not be possible, but in any case you want to make it in a well-ventilated place – it can be really strong.

  • 1 piece of horseradish
  • White vinegar
  • Salt

In a well-ventilated place, trim the ends of the horseradish and peel it until you get to the white part. Cut it into 1” chunks. Put the chunks into a blender and blend until it’s finely chopped. Put it in a container (like a Ball jar) and add enough vinegar to cover. Taste and add salt as needed. It will keep refrigerated for a while but loses pungency over time.

Accidental Locavore DIY HorseradishMy verdict: Great stuff! As you may or may not know, freshness is really the key to horseradish. When I did a taste test a few months ago, the clear winner was the most recent one I bought. After I made this batch I tasted the stuff that was in my fridge and it was so bland compared to this. Now I just have to find a bunch of uses for it, besides Bloody Marys and mashed potatoes. I started this outside with my food processor but it really wasn’t up to the job. If you have one, a blender is much better for this. Also, if you’re working with a particularly strong piece of horseradish, adding the vinegar when you’re blending it will stop whatever the enzyme is that makes it strong. Water will also tone it down, but I think the vinegar makes it more interesting. What’s your favorite use for horseradish?

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