cabbage

Cabbage and Farro Soup

by Anne Maxfield on February 4, 2019

Accidental Locavore Cabbage Soup with FarroThis cabbage soup was making the rounds of the Internet recently and everyone was raving about how good it was. It’s from Smitten Kitchen and serves 4.

Cabbage and Farro Soup

  • 1 pound cabbage: savoy or green
  • Olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
  • Salt and pepper
  • 3 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 1 sprig of rosemary or thyme
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 2/3 cup uncooked farro
  • About 4 cups broth (beef, chicken or vegetable)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice plus more to taste
  • Shaved Parmesan, to finish

Accidental Locavore Cabbage for SoupCut out the cabbage core and finely chop it. Cut the leaves into 1/8” ribbons.

Heat 1/4 cup olive oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion and cabbage core, salt and pepper, and cook, stirring frequently, until the onion starts to soften but is not yet browned, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add the garlic and cook another 3- 5 minutes, until the garlic softens.

Add the shredded cabbage leaves and herb sprig, if using. Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover the pot and let it steam a bit to soften the leaves, then toss the cabbage to combine with other ingredients. Cook, covered, until the cabbage is very sweet and tender,15-30 minutes depending on the type of cabbage you’re using. Stir occasionally.

Meanwhile, in a small skillet, heat a glug of olive oil over medium heat and add the uncooked farro. Toast it, stirring, for a few minutes, until it’s about half a shade darker.

When the cabbage is ready, stir in the vinegar. Taste and season with more salt and pepper. Add the farro and broth. Bring mixture to a simmer and cook for 25 to 35 minutes, until farro is tender. The soup will be very thick, but if you’d prefer more liquid, add another 1/2 cup broth or water. Taste and adjust seasoning again. Stir in lemon juice.

Ladle into bowls and finish each with a drizzle of olive oil and a shower of Parmesan, serve and enjoy!

Accidental Locavore Farro for Cabbage Soup

My verdict: Frank loved it, but I was disappointed in it. I had great ingredients, cabbage, garlic and onions from the farm, homemade chicken broth but it was a long process and in the end it was cabbage soup.

As a friend said about a recent food event—meh.

The original recipe comes from Six Seasons: A New Way With Vegetables which I happen to have on my iPad. He calls for meat or poultry broth and I’m wondering if beef broth would be a better way to go. I did add a couple of pieces of smoked pig skin (left from making bacon) for flavor, and used good homemade chicken broth, but neither took it into the realm of super deliciousness.

Both recipes said it would be thick, but mine was pretty soup-like. Not sure what browning the farro achieved except dirtying another pan.

Since I was on the fence about this, I gave it a time out and left it alone for a few days. Time made it thicker (the farro absorbing more broth) and a squeeze of lemon and some shaved parmesan gave it flavor. I’m still not wowed, there are better soups out there that come together faster. What do you think?

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5 Ingredient Sausage and Cabbage Casserole

by Anne Maxfield on November 3, 2016

accidental-locavore-5-ingredieant-sliced-cabbage5 ingredient sausage and cabbage seemed like a good fall dish, since I had a couple of those cute pointy cabbages from my CSA and sausage in the freezer.

Then it was 80°.

The Accidental Locavore waited until the temperature shot back down and gave this a try.

Putting it together is quick and easy, but it needs 2 ½ hours to cook, so plan ahead (or save for a weekend).

5 Ingredient Sausage and Cabbage Casserole

  • Salt
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 pounds fresh sweet Italian pork sausages or bulk sausage
  • 1 large green or Savoy cabbage, about 4 pounds, cored and thickly shredded
  • Freshly ground black pepper

accidental-locavore-5-ingredient-cabbage-and-sausage-prepHeat oven to 300°.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and butter a 9-by-13-by-2-inch baking dish.

Place cabbage in boiling water, cover, and let water come back to the boil. Uncover and boil for 3 minutes. Drain cabbage in a colander and run cold water over it to stop cooking.

Remove sausage casings and crumble the sausages in a bowl.

Put about 1/3 of the cabbage in buttered dish and cover with 1/2 the meat. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and dot with butter. Repeat, ending with a final layer of cabbage, and dot top with butter.

Cover dish tightly with a layer of parchment paper, cut to the shape of your dish and top with a lid or a layer of aluminum foil.

Cook for about 2 1/2 hours, until cabbage is soft and sweet, and top is lightly browned.

After 2 hours, uncover the dish: if there is a lot of liquid in the bottom, leave uncovered for the rest of the cooking time. If not, re-cover and finish cooking.

Serve with mustard and some crusty bread and enjoy!

accidental-locavore-5-ingredient-cabbage-and-sausageMy verdict: Who knew 5 ingredients could be this good! I’m not sure if these “conehead” cabbages we’ve been getting are sweeter than the normal green cabbage, but they are cute and really tasty! If you can find them, try them (the cores are almost non-existent for easy prep). I had two of them, about 2 pounds, and a pound package of Boerewors, a South African inspired sausage from Jacuterie, so halved the recipe and it easily fed two.

It was delicious and buttery and the sausages were great with it! You could use almost any sausage, so feel free to improvise. A strong Dijon was a nice addition but even a milder coarse mustard went well.

Give it a try when you have a couple of hours to cook it. If you didn’t care about browning the top, it would probably work well in a slow cooker.

Let me know what you think.

 

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A New Take on an Old Classic – The Wedge Salad

by Anne Maxfield on July 16, 2015

Accidental Locavore Cabbage WedgeThe Accidental Locavore came across this new idea for the classic iceburg wedge. This wedge is cabbage and it’s sweet and delicious, roasted or grilled. Make the dressing ahead of time and refrigerate for up to a week, if you like. Serves 4:

Accidental Locavore Blue Cheese Dressing MakingsFor the dressing:

  • ½ cup (about 3.5 oz) crumbled blue cheese, at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 3 tablespoons buttermilk
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon Sriracha
  • Salt and pepper

Accidental Locavore Cabbage Wedge PrepFor the salad:

  • 6 to 8 thin slices pastrami (2 to 3 oz.)
  • 1 small head (2 to 3 lb.) green cabbage, outer leaves removed
  • 1/4 cup canola or other neutral oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 8 to 10 oz. cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced chives

Make the dressing: In a small bowl, mash the blue cheese with a fork. Add the mayonnaise, Worcestershire sauce, buttermilk, lemon juice, Sriracha, and a pinch of salt and black pepper. Stir to combine.

Make the salad: Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400°F. Lay the pastrami flat on a small foil-lined baking sheet and roast until crisp, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel, cool, then crumble into about 1” pieces.

Accidental Locavore Pastrami ShredsCut the cabbage into 4 wedges through the root end, leaving some of the core intact on each piece so the wedges don’t fall apart. On a large foil-lined rimmed baking sheet, coat the cabbage wedges with the oil and season with salt and pepper. Put the wedges on a flat side and roast until browned on the bottom, about 20 minutes. (Don’t worry if the outer leaves begin to burn.) Flip each wedge and continue roasting until the second side is browned as well, about 10 minutes longer. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly.

Accidental Locavore Grilled CabbageSpread about a tablespoon of the blue cheese dressing on each of four serving plates. Place a cabbage wedge on top and drizzle with more of the remaining dressing. Scatter the pastrami, tomatoes and chives over the wedges and garnish with the tomatoes. Serve and enjoy!

My verdict: I probably came late to the table on roasting/grilling leafy greens, and am trying to make up for lost time. I did roast the cabbage in the oven, and then stuck it on the grill to give it a little more flavor. It was delicious – the cabbage was a little warm and sweet from the roasting. It’s a good blue cheese dressing and if you want to spice it up more, just add some more Sriracha. The pastrami was good mixed with the dressing because of the spices coating it, but bacon would be a fine substitute. If you were short on buttermilk, some plain yogurt or sour cream would work, just taste it before adding too much. Give it a try and let me know what you think, ok?

 

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Charcutepalooza March Challenge: Brining Corned Beef

by Anne Maxfield on March 14, 2011

Accidental Locavore Corned Beef and Cabbage

How do you feel about corned beef? The Accidental Locavore is usually not a huge fan of brisket or corned beef, however this month’s Charcutepalooza challenge is to brine either chicken,  pork, or for the advanced challenge, to make corned beef. I’ve brined a lot of local chickens, a turkey or two, and various cuts of pork, so Charcutepalooza members, watch out! It’s time to tackle corned beef!

Corned beef is one of those things I eat to be polite. Many friends of mine swoon over the idea of a corned beef or brisket dinner, not me. It’s the preparation; brisket is usually cooked to death (except for my friend Leslie’s…secret ingredient: a can of soda). Corned beef and cabbage or New England boiled dinner, the smell of the cabbage lingering for days…no thanks.

Accidental Locavore Charcutepalooza-smallSo when I saw this Charcutepalooza challenge I knew that at the end of five days, there would be a pot of goodness containing an amazing corned beef! Even before the brine cooled, good friends were invited for dinner. I’m thinking if I put a pot au feu twist on this, it should be delicious.

After clearing a rather large piece of real estate in my refrigerator, I set the pot with the brisket to brine for five days. Along with the Accidental Locavore Corned Beef in Brine Weightedplate to weigh it down, which seemed to just float in the pot, I added a 2 ½ pound weight from my dumbbell (what a good excuse not to use it for five days, right?).  Yesterday it was removed from the brine, thoroughly rinsed and simmered until tender.

What emerged? A beautiful piece of corned beef that might make a believer out of me. After the meat was removed from the pot, I added ½ an enormous (really enormous) cabbage cut into wedges, and some of the last of the local potatoes from my farmer and let them cook in the flavored stock for about 20 minutes. On the side, two kinds of mustard, and some of my homemade pickles from the summer.

Accidental Locavore Corned Beef SlicedThe verdict? My husband said it was the best corned beef he’s ever had. Our friend BJ seconded his vote, and would have had seconds but is on an only-one-serving diet. What about the locavore non-believer? It was awfully good, and except for needing way too much room in a New York City apartment refrigerator, certainly easy to make. Next step? When the weather gets warmer, smoking one…that’s pastrami if you haven’t been paying attention.

Check out the Friday blog for the recipe for the blueberry caramel sauce I served over vanilla ice cream for dessert. 4 ingredients guaranteed to put a smile on your face (and don’t forget, blueberries are a super food).

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