Miscellaneous Recipes

Quince Chutney Recipe

by Anne Maxfield on January 5, 2017

Accidental Locavore Quince for ChutneyAfter making the lamb and quince tagine, the Accidental Locavore still had a few quince rolling around the kitchen.

This chutney looked like an interesting way to put them to good use and I happened to have all the ingredients on hand – always an incentive!

Makes about 3 cups.

Quince Chutney Recipe

  • 1 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil
  • 1 large shallot, minced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 1/2 pounds quinces (about 3), peeled, cored, and diced
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries, chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups loosely packed light brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 3 green cardamom pods, crushed
  • 3 black peppercorns, crushed
  • 1 cinnamon stick

Accidental Locavore Quince Chopped for ChutneyHeat the oil in a deep, non-reactive (stainless steel or enamel) pot over medium heat. Add the shallot and garlic and cook, stirring frequently, until shallots are translucent.

Add remaining ingredients to the saucepan and bring to a boil.

Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, for about an hour or until the consistency is thick and jammy.

Serve chutney at room temperature and enjoy!

Accidental Locavore Quince ChutneyMy verdict: Delicious! This was a lovely accompaniment to a variety of cheeses (not that good cheese really needs it) we had at a friend’s house. It was also great with some roast pork we had for the holidays.

Prepping the quince is a lot like prepping apples and they tend to turn brown like apples, but it doesn’t matter since they’re going to be cooked down.

If you don’t have dried cherries, try dried cranberries, or a mix. If you like raisins, they would probably work well too.

My chutney took about 90 minutes to become what looked like “jammy” to me. However, when it cooled down it got much thicker. Depending on how thick you want the end product to be, cook it for 60-90 minutes on low heat. I used a non-stick pan which made cleaning up easy.

 

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A Local Apple Relish Recipe

by Anne Maxfield on October 6, 2016

Accidental Locavore Red Hook ApplesThis apple relish came last year when I was playing golf with friends, it’s simple and a nice way to use up a couple of apples.

The Accidental Locavore decided on a condiment to go with the two chèvres I had from Goat Cheeses of France. The Red Hook Golf Club was originally an apple orchard, and hundreds of apple trees still line the fairways. This has been a terrific year for apples and there are literally thousands of them, ripe for the picking. I grabbed a bunch of Romes and McIntoshes from my favorite trees (around the tee box on the fifth hole) and made a simple relish for the cheeses. This made about 2 cups:

Apple Relish Recipe:

  • ½ cup of sugar, more or less depending on your apples
  • ¼ cup cider vinegar
  • Salt
  • 1 ½ pounds tart, crisp apples, peeled and cut into 1/2” chunks
  • ½ teaspoon freshly grated ginger

Accidental Locavore Apple RelishIn a medium sized pot over medium heat, heat the sugar and vinegar, stirring to dissolve.

Stir in the apples and cook for about 5 minutes, until the apples are cooked but still hold their shape. Stir in the ginger, taste and add salt as needed.

Cool to room temperature. Serve and enjoy!

My verdict: Although I’m not generally a fan of “stuff” other than bread or a plain cracker with cheese, this was a nice addition.

The apples had a nice fresh flavor that contrasted well with the rich funkiness of the cheeses. Leaving them in chunks kept them from turning into mush (aka apple sauce).

The ginger added a hint of spice and some brightness. Now that I’ve done my posts for the Goat Cheeses of France, I can sit back, relax and enjoy their wonderful chèvres my way, with a baguette. The rest of the relish I’ll use to garnish a duck, or go more traditional with some pork chops or smoked pork tenderloin.

What would you use it with?

 

 

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Thai Sweet Chili Sauce Recipe

by Anne Maxfield on September 8, 2016

accidental-locavore-thai-sweet-chile-sauceThai sweet chili sauce may not be one of the condiments you reach for, but that could change quickly.

It’s really versatile and goes well with everything from fish to French fries.

Trust me.

The Accidental Locavore’s husband, Frank, first fell in love with it at the Oakhurst Diner in Millerton and promptly ordered a couple of bottles. One evening we were desperately scraping the last bits out of the bottle.

There had to be a recipe online.

There was, and now Thai sweet chili sauce is always in our fridge.

Thai Sweet Chili Sauce Recipe:

Quick and easy, this makes about a cup.

  • 3 large garlic cloves, peeled
  • 2 red Jalapeño or Serrano chiles, stemmed and seeded
  • ¼ cup white distilled vinegar
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ½ tablespoon salt
  • ¾ cup water
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons water

accidental-locavore-thai-sweet-chili-sauce-prepIn a blender, purée the garlic, chiles, vinegar, sugar, salt and water.

Transfer the mixture to a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Lower the heat to medium and simmer until the mixture thickens up a bit and the garlic-pepper bits begin to soften, about 3 minutes.

In a small bowl or cup, mix the cornstarch and water to make a slurry. Whisk in the cornstarch mixture and continue to simmer until the sauce starts to thicken slightly (and causes a nice suspension of the garlic-pepper bits). Let cool completely before storing in a glass jar. Serve and enjoy!

accidental-locavore-bag-o-chilesMy verdict: Another thing we’ll never buy again!

It’s probably better made with a blender, but if all you have is a food processor, that will work too.

This version was a little hotter than the bottled one (we did save a bit for comparison), but it really mellows after a couple of days in the fridge.

If you’re worried about the heat, finely chop all the chiles, throw a little bit in the blender and add more until it gets to your desired heat level. A lot will depend on the chiles you have (and if all you have are green ones, that’s fine, it might just look a little weird).

Store the chili sauce in the refrigerator and let us know in the comments what your favorite use for it is.

 

 

 

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Oatmeal Banana…Dog Biscuits

by Anne Maxfield on August 18, 2016

Accidental Locavore Rif With Dog BiscuitIn the Accidental Locavore’s mind as I was mixing up these dog biscuits was the refrain from those dumb Geico commercials…“if you’re a ______, that’s what you do.”

If I’m a cook, that’s what I do. Doesn’t matter—humans or canines.

What really spurred this on was a recipe for these cookies on BarkPost and a very ripe banana that was on its way into the garbage.

They’re really simple, you probably have everything on hand, and just remember, unlike humans, a dog is never going to complain about a cookie. Makes about 20 3” bone-shaped dog biscuits.

Accidental Locavore Cutting Dog BiscuitsDog biscuits:

  • 3 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 ripe banana, peeled and mashed
  • Water as needed
  • Flour for rolling the dough

Preheat the oven to 350°. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper and set aside.

In a blender or food processor (blender is preferable), blend the oats until you have a fine powder.

In a medium bowl, add the oatmeal flour, coconut oil, cinnamon, honey, and banana. Mix until well combined into a stiff dough. If the dough is too stiff, add a little water. Or, if it’s too sticky add a little flour.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough until it’s about ½” thick. Using a pizza cutter cut into rectangles, or, if you do have a dog bone cookie cutter…

Bake for about 25 minutes until golden brown. Cool, treat and enjoy!

Accidental Locavore Oatmeal Dog BiscuitsRif’s verdict: Woof, woof! Much better than those healthy dehydrated sweet potatoes (don’t tell him these are healthy too!). I’ll sit for one of these anytime!

Frank’s verdict: “Are these for the dog?” Maybe the bone shape gave it away. He thought they needed salt, something he rarely says.

My dog biscuits looked coarser than the BarkPost ones, probably should have run the oats through a blender rather than the Cuisinart, but I was multi-tasking. If your dog is like mine, you might want to make a double batch.

 

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